Best Wide Receivers in Arizona Cardinals History

Updated on October 30, 2019
Arizona Cardinals receivers, Michael Floyd (15) and Larry Fitzgerald (11), celebrate after Floyd scored against the Washington Redskins in 2016. Both are among the 13 players in Cardinals' history to catch more than 1,000 receiving yards in a season.
Arizona Cardinals receivers, Michael Floyd (15) and Larry Fitzgerald (11), celebrate after Floyd scored against the Washington Redskins in 2016. Both are among the 13 players in Cardinals' history to catch more than 1,000 receiving yards in a season. | Source

The Top 10 Cardinals Wide Receivers of All-Time

When it comes to wide receivers, the Arizona Cardinals know how to pick them. The team has had at least one bona fide receiver in its lineup for almost every season since the 1960s, and has watched one of its players rack up at least 900 receiving yards in a season 52 times. 13 players have taken that a step further by gaining 1,000 yards in a season. With that history, several players are in the mix when considering the best wide receivers in Arizona Cardinals history.

Wide receiver legends have come in a steady stream for the Cardinals. The 1970s were a little sparse in terms of production, but several memorable receivers still took the field, and the 1980s brought about the greatest receiver the franchise had seen. Then, starting in the late 1990s, the position solidified, and more legends were born. Multiple Arizona receivers have caught more than 1,000 yards in the same season five times since 1997—including three such players who achieved the feat during the 2008 season. Since that year, which saw Arizona's offense propel the team to Super Bowl XLIII, production from the position had stayed strong, and the future remains bright.

Selection Criteria for This List

This is a list of the 10 greatest Cardinals wide receivers of all-time, and also includes a handful of honorable-mention candidates and statistics from every 1,000-yard receiving season in team history. The criteria used to develop this list includes:

  • Legacy Honors (Hall of Fame, Ring of Honor, retired number, etc.)
  • Single-Season Honors (MVP, All-Pro, Pro Bowl, etc.)
  • On-Field Success (league leader, playoff appearances, records, etc.)
  • Longevity (years with Cardinals, percentage of career with Cardinals, etc.)

Only games played with the Cardinals are factored into this list, so while Gary Clark would be a great player to include on a list about the Washington Redskins, his two seasons of strong production with the Cardinals won't place him in the top 10 here. Additionally, only wide receivers are included, so neither great tight end Jackie Smith nor pass-catching fullback Larry Centers will be listed here. Now, without further ado, let's count down the top 10 receivers in Arizona Cardinals history, and feel free to chime in with your thoughts on these selections.

10. David Boston

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1999–02
  • Pro Bowl: 2001
  • All-Pro: 2001

David Boston was a brash rookie out of Ohio State who was in and out of the starting lineup during the 1999 season. But once he focused more on football instead of showboating, he became a superstar for the Arizona Cardinals. Boston was the eighth overall draft pick in 1999 and had the expected growing pains of a rookie. Every now and again, however, Boston showed flashes of brilliance that justified his draft position.

In his fifth game of his rookie season, he caught eight passes for 101 yards and his first career touchdown in a win over the New York Giants. He doubled his career reception total and nearly tripled his career yardage total with that effort, but he wouldn't cross the 100-yard threshold again the rest of the season. After being moved into a feature role his sophomore season, Boston caught a pair of touchdowns in the season-opener, then added a 184-yard performance later in the season. He was targeted at least six times in all but two games, setting up the stage for a breakout season in 2001.

While racking up nine games with more than 100 receiving yards, Boston was a one-man offensive show in Arizona, and he used 58 yards in the last game of the season to become the franchise's new all-time leader for single-season receiving yardage. That record of 1,598 yards still stands, and his breakout was attributed to improved technique and focus on the game, as well as reshaping his body to build strength without sacrificing speed. Boston was unable to follow up on his 2001 success, as he suffered a season-ending knee injury in Week 9 in 2002. In free agency, he then bolted to the San Diego Chargers for a big contract, leaving Arizona with 241 catches for 3,739 yards and 18 touchdowns.

David Boston's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1999
16
8
40
473
2
2000
16
16
71
1156
7
2001
16
15
98
1598
8
2002
8
8
32
512
1
Oakland Raiders assistant coach, Rob Moore, watches his team play against the Arizona Cardinals during a 2016 preseason game. Moore is among the most significant receivers in Cardinals' history.
Oakland Raiders assistant coach, Rob Moore, watches his team play against the Arizona Cardinals during a 2016 preseason game. Moore is among the most significant receivers in Cardinals' history. | Source

9. Rob Moore

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1995–99
  • Playoff Appearances: 1998
  • Pro Bowl: 1997
  • All-Pro: 1997

The Arizona Cardinals put up a small bounty to acquire Robert "Rob" Moore from the New York Jets, netting the veteran receiver in exchange for first- and fourth-round draft picks and running back Ronald Moore. The franchise rewarded Rob Moore with the richest contract in team history, and he rewarded their confidence with five productive years.

Following the 1994 season, the Cardinals were in desperate need of receivers after parting ways with three of them, and Moore provided both a consistent big-play threat and a mentor to second-round draft pick Frank Sanders. Together, Moore and Sanders provided a steady tandem that helped push the Cardinals into the 1998 playoffs, and between two postseason games, Moore was targeted 26 times and gained 132 yards. All together, in his five seasons, Moore caught 322 passes for 5,110 yards and 27 touchdowns. That included a monster season in 1997, which saw him lead the league with a then-franchise record 1,584 yards. He was just 16 yards shy of becoming the 21st player to average 100 yards per game in a season, and he finished 176 yards ahead of runner-up Tim Brown.

Moore was more than an on-the-field talent, however. He continued to work with the New York-based Rob Moore Foundation in Phoenix as soon as he arrived. As part of that program, he allocated 20 tickets for each game to go to students excelling in the classroom at local schools.

Rob Moore's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1995
15
15
63
907
5
1996
16
16
58
1016
4
1997
16
16
97
1584
8
1998
16
16
67
982
5
1999
14
10
37
621
5

8. Bobby Joe Conrad

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1958–68
  • Pro Bowl: 1964
  • All-Pro: 1963

Robert Joseph "Bobby Joe" Conrad didn't start his career as a wide receiver, but by the time he was permanently placed at the position in 1961, he was ready to prove that he belonged. Formerly a two-way player at Texas A&M, Conrad was drafted by the New York Giants as a defensive back in 1958, but was traded to the Cardinals a few months later. Conrad spent one season on defense, then was used primarily in the rushing attack for the next two years.

The Cardinals moved Conrad to flanker in 1961, and the experience he gained set up his two finest receiving seasons. He never crossed the 1,000-yard threshold, but was consistently in the box score every game the next two seasons, catching at least two passes in all 28 games. In 1963, he led the league with 73 catches, setting a franchise record that would stand for two decades.

Conrad started every game for the next five seasons, and from 1961–68, caught a pass in 94 straight games. That fell one game shy of the NFL record, then held by Don Hutson. After that streak ended, Conrad said he'd retire at season's end, but left the door open to play one season close to his home in Texas, which is why he was traded to the Dallas Cowboys. The fan favorite ended his career with the Cardinals after catching 418 passes for 5,828 yards and 38 touchdowns.

Bobby Joe Conrad's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1958
12
8
0
0
0
1959
12
12
14
142
3
1960
12
4
7
103
0
1961
14
13
30
499
2
1962
14
14
62
954
4
1963
14
14
73
967
10
1964
14
14
61
780
6
1965
14
14
58
909
5
1966
14
14
34
388
2
1967
14
14
47
637
2
1968
14
14
32
449
4

7. Frank Sanders

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1995–02
  • Playoff Appearances: 1998

Frank Sanders had very little time to adjust to the NFL. As a second-round draft selection of the Arizona Cardinals in 1995, Sanders was immediately thrown into a major role as the team rebuilt its receiving corps. He caught at least one pass in the first 15 games of his career, and showed big-play potential by averaging nearly 17 yards per catch. His best game came in Week 6, when he came away with 108 yards and his only two touchdowns of the season in a loss to the New York Giants.

Sanders rarely posted gaudy statistical numbers, instead helping spread the field and draw defenders away from superstars like Rob Moore and David Boston. But Sanders always made sure to play his part, too. From 1996–2001, he played every game and failed to catch a pass in only two of them. His best individual games both came in losses for Arizona. During Week 12 of 1997, Sanders hauled in nine passes for 188 yards in a 19-10 loss to the Giants, and in Week 11 of 1998, he caught 11 passes for 190 yards in a 35-28 loss to the Dallas Cowboys.

Sanders left for the Baltimore Ravens after the 2002 season, despite Arizona's attempts to keep him. While with the Cardinals, Sanders caught 493 passes for 6,579 yards and 24 touchdowns.

Frank Sanders' Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1995
16
15
52
883
2
1996
16
16
69
813
4
1997
16
16
75
1017
4
1998
16
16
89
1145
3
1999
16
16
79
954
1
2000
16
16
54
749
6
2001
15
13
41
618
2
2002
12
12
34
400
2

6. Pat Tilley

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1976–86
  • Pro Bowl: 1980

Patrick "Pat" Tilley stood small in stature at just 5-foot-10, 175 pounds, when he was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the fourth round of the 1976 NFL Draft. The Louisiana Tech product didn't play too often as a receiver in his first two seasons, but then became a mainstay for the Cardinals' offense. He missed just three games from 1978–85, and amassed at least 690 yards each of those seasons except the strike-shortened 1982 campaign.

Going into the 1986 season, Tilley was just 16 receptions shy of breaking the franchise record, but he'd play just one game. In the season-opener, he snared three passes for 51 yards on a pulled hamstring, but later in the week, Tilley was placed on injured reserve due to a severe back injury. He would never return, but also will never be forgotten by Cardinals fans after catching 468 passes for 7,005 yards and 37 touchdowns.

Pat Tilley's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1976
13
5
26
407
1
1977
14
0
5
64
0
1978
16
16
62
900
3
1979
16
16
57
938
6
1980
14
14
68
966
6
1981
16
16
66
1040
3
1982
9
8
36
465
2
1983
16
16
44
690
5
1984
16
16
52
758
5
1985
16
16
49
726
6
1986
1
1
3
51
0

5. Sonny Randle

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1959–66
  • Pro Bowl: 1960–62, 1965
  • All-Pro: 1960

Ulmo Shannon "Sonny" Randle was one of two rookie receivers tasked with trying to help rebuild the Chicago Cardinals' offensive attack in 1959. As a speedster, Randle struggled to establish himself in his first season—playing five games and scoring just once. That would all change in his sophomore season, in which he led the league in touchdowns and finished second in receptions. In four games that season—including the season-opener—Randle caught three touchdown passes.

Throughout his career, Randle typically started the season strong, catching seven career touchdowns in Week 1. He also grabbed two touchdowns in his first game of the 1961 season, but those came in Week 2. In 1962, Randle had the best individual game of his career, when he hauled in a then-NFL record 16 passes for a single-game team record 256 yards and a touchdown. That helped push him over the 1,000-yard mark for the season, a feat he would repeat in 1963.

During the following season, Randle was on pace for more than 1,000 yards again, but suffered an injury mid-season. He was injured again in 1966, and those ailments prevented him from becoming more of a legend than he already was. In his career with the Cardinals, Randle hauled in 328 passes for 5,438 yards and 60 touchdowns. He held the franchise record for career receiving touchdowns from 1966–89.

Sonny Randle's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1959
10
 
15
202
1
1960
12
12
62
893
15
1961
14
14
44
591
9
1962
14
14
63
1158
7
1963
14
13
51
1014
12
1964
7
7
25
517
5
1965
14
14
51
845
9
1966
14
11
17
218
2

4. Anquan Boldin

  • Years With the Cardinals: 2003–09
  • Playoff Appearances: 2008–09
  • Pro Bowl: 2003, '06, '08
  • Major Awards: ROY, 2003

Anquan Boldin had one of the best-ever starts to an NFL career after being taken as a second-round draft pick in 2003. He had 217 receiving yards in his first game, and an additional four more games of at least 100 yards on his way to winning the Offensive Rookie of the Year award. Boldin was honored after the season a second time, when he was the only rookie selected to the Pro Bowl. Two years later, he averaged more than 100 yards per game, despite missing two games with an injury.

As a part of a prolific offense that featured quarterback Kurt Warner and fellow receiver Larry Fitzgerald, Boldin continued to produce numbers that have him in contention for election into the Pro Football Hall of Fame when he becomes eligible in 2022. Along the way, he became the fastest player to reach 200, 300, 400, and 500 career receptions. His efforts helped the Cardinals appear in Super Bowl XLIII, and he caught a 71-yard touchdown during the 2008 postseason.

In Boldin's time with the Cardinals, he caught 586 passes for 7,520 yards and 40 touchdowns. He maintains league records with 217 yards in his first game and 101 receptions in his first season. Among his team records are his 100.1 yards per game average from 2005, as well as his 6.2 receptions per game from his seven years with the team.

Anquan Boldin's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
2003
16
16
101
1377
8
2004
10
9
56
623
1
2005
14
14
102
1402
7
2006
16
16
83
1203
4
2007
12
11
71
853
9
2008
12
11
89
1038
11
2009
15
15
84
1024
4

3. Mel Gray

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1971–82
  • Playoff Appearances: 1974–75
  • Pro Bowl: 1974–77
  • All-Pro: 1975

Melvin "Mel" Gray was a two-sport standout at Missouri, and stayed near school when the St. Louis Cardinals selected him in the sixth round of the 1971 NFL Draft. The speed that made him a track star proved to be an asset for the Cardinals, who used Gray to lengthen the field throughout his 12-year career. In all but three of his seasons, he caught a pass of at least 69 yards, and went for an 80-yard touchdown three times. Twenty of his 45 career touchdown passes were for at least 50 yards, and 10 of his first 11 scores went for at least 40 yards.

Gray never caught 1,000 yards in a season, but his consistent big-play ability and sure hands made him a reliable asset for the Cardinals. His 18.9 yards per reception are the most among Cardinals players with at least 150 catches, and his 4 fumbles are the fewest in team history among receivers to play 100 or more games. In his final season, Gray was on pace to break the NFL record for consecutive games with a reception, but he had to settle for a streak of 121 such games when a knee injury held him to just four catches in five games. At the time, the record was 127 games. During his long Cardinals career, Gray was on the receiving end of 351 passes for 6,644 yards.

Mel Gray's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1971
14
5
18
534
4
1972
7
1
3
62
0
1973
12
9
29
513
7
1974
14
14
39
770
6
1975
14
14
48
926
11
1976
11
11
36
686
5
1977
14
14
38
782
5
1978
13
12
44
871
1
1979
13
13
25
447
1
1980
16
16
40
709
3
1981
12
12
27
310
2
1982
5
0
4
34
0

2. Roy Green

  • Years With the Cardinals: 1979–90
  • Pro Bowl: 1983–84
  • All-Pro: 1983–84
  • Legacy Honors: Cardinals Ring of Honor

Roy "Jet Stream" Green didn't come into the NFL in 1979 with high expectations as a fourth-round pick out of Henderson State in Arkansas. He didn't come with expectations to be a wide receiver, either. It wasn't until his third season in the league that he made the part-time switch after coaches observed him playing catch in practice. It was 1981, and the Cardinals needed receivers, so they turned to Green, who was one of their defensive backs and a kick returner. Green accepted the challenge, and became one of the league's best. He averaged 21.5 yards per catch that season—including a 60-yard scamper on his first reception of the season. In his second game as a receiver, he caught a touchdown and intercepted a pass on defense, becoming the first player to do so since 1957.

During the following season, Green became a full-time receiver, and had 170 yards in one game of the strike-shortened 1982 season. With a full slate of games in 1983, Green eclipsed the 1,000-yard mark for the first time while leading the league with 14 touchdowns—four of which came in a win over Seattle. His final tally of 1,227 yards set a new single-season franchise record.

His 1984 campaign was even better. He smashed his newly minted record with a league-best 1,555 receiving yards on the strength of five games, where he finished with 160 yards or more. Included was a three-game stretch that saw him make 20 catches for 518 yards, as well as a blistering finale of 8 catches, for a career-high 196 yards. Injuries would slow him the next several seasons, however, and while he would lead the team in receiving yardage one more time (with 1,097 in 1988), he only gained 100-plus yards in a game nine times between 1985–90.

The Cardinals looked to make their roster younger for the 1991 season, and traded Green to the Cleveland Browns for a sixth-round draft pick. Green left the Cardinals holding franchise records for receptions (522), receiving yards (8,496), and touchdowns (66), and was memorialized in the franchise's Ring of Honor in 2016.

Roy Green's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
1979
16
0
1
15
0
1980
15
6
0
0
0
1981
16
2
33
708
4
1982
9
9
32
453
3
1983
16
15
78
1227
14
1984
16
16
78
1555
12
1985
13
13
50
693
5
1986
11
10
42
517
6
1987
12
12
43
731
4
1988
16
16
68
1097
7
1989
12
12
44
703
7
1990
16
16
53
797
4
Larry Fitzgerald is the best wide receiver in Arizona Cardinals history. Still active, Fitzgerald already owns the majority of the franchise's receiving records.
Larry Fitzgerald is the best wide receiver in Arizona Cardinals history. Still active, Fitzgerald already owns the majority of the franchise's receiving records. | Source

1. Larry Fitzgerald

  • Years With the Cardinals: 2004–present
  • Playoff Appearances: 2008–09, 2014–15
  • Pro Bowl: 2005, 2007–13, 2015–17
  • All-Pro: 2008–09, '11
  • Major Awards: Pro Bowl MVP, 2008

There is no argument that the greatest wide receiver in Arizona Cardinals history is Lawrence "Larry" Fitzgerald. A model of consistency throughout his entire career, Fitzgerald has been the face of the Cardinals for 16 years, missing just six games in that span. With nearly double the yardage and touchdowns of any other player in Cardinals history, Fitzgerald has established himself as a legend and holds most every receiving mark in the franchise record book. He will undoubtedly become the first receiver in team history to be a first-ballot electee to the Pro Football Hall of Fame (assuming Anquan Boldin doesn't beat him to it).

Fitzgerald was a first-round draft pick out of the University of Pittsburgh and was picked up by Arizona to carry on the tradition of standout receivers. The Cardinals couldn't have known at the time that they had selected who would become one of the greatest wide receivers in the history of the NFL. He's twice led the league in receptions (2005 and 2016) and touchdown catches (2008–09). From the middle of 2004 through 2018, he caught a pass in 213 straight games in which he played.

In both the 2005 and 2008 seasons, he had seven games with more than 100 receiving yards. Sandwiched between those years were two of his best individual games—an 11-catch, 172-yard effort in 2006, and an 11-catch, 171-yard effort in 2007. He set a career-high with three touchdowns in a 2015 matchup against the Chicago Bears. All told, he has 49 games with at least 100 receiving yards, and has scored at least twice in a game 19 times.

Among Fitzgerald's franchise records are 1,341 catches for 16,726 yards, and 118 touchdowns. He also has seven postseason touchdown catches and appeared in Super Bowl XLIII, a game in which he caught a pair of touchdowns. All-time among NFL receivers, Fitzgerald is second in career receptions and receiving yardage, and sixth in career receiving touchdowns. He was the youngest player to reach 700, 800, 900, and 1,000 receptions for his career. Fitzgerald has also been active off the field, donating time and money to numerous causes over the course of his career.

Larry Fitzgerald's Year-by-Year Statistics With the Cardinals

Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
2004
16
16
58
780
8
2005
16
16
103
1409
10
2006
13
13
69
946
6
2007
15
15
100
1409
10
2008
16
16
96
1431
12
2009
16
16
97
1092
13
2010
16
15
90
1137
6
2011
16
16
80
1411
8
2012
16
16
71
798
4
2013
16
16
82
954
10
2014
14
13
63
784
2
2015
16
16
109
1215
9
2016
16
16
107
1023
6
2017
16
16
109
1156
6
2018
16
16
69
734
6
2019
8
8
38
447
2

Honorable Mentions

With so many standout wide receivers in the history of the Cardinals, listed below are several players who left an indelible mark on team history but didn't quite make the top 10.

J.T. Smith

John Thomas "J.T." Smith had two 1,000-yard receiving seasons for the Cardinals, and nearly had a third. He led the league with 91 catches for 1,117 yards in 1987. That season was a solid follow-up to his 1986 campaign, which saw him snare 80 passes for 1,014 yards. He finished with 986 yards in 1988. From 1985–90, he caught 377 passes for the Cardinals, racking up 4,701 yards and 27 touchdowns.

Ricky Proehl

Richard "Ricky" Proehl made an impact right away after getting selected by the Cardinals in the third round of the 1990 NFL draft. He set the team's rookie record with 56 catches, which he turned into 802 yards. Prohel was very consistent, closing each of his four seasons with the Cardinals between 744 and 877 receiving yards. His career totals with the team were 287 receptions for 3,840 yards and 21 touchdowns.

Michael Floyd

Michael Floyd was a first-round draft pick of the Cardinals in 2012, and he went to work right away, catching his first career pass for a touchdown. He would gain 1,041 yards his sophomore season, including 193 yards in a game against Jacksonville. Floyd followed this with back-to-back seasons where he finished over 800 yards. He was released during the 2016 season after some legal troubles. During his time with the Cardinals, Floyd caught 242 passes for 3,739 yards and 23 touchdowns.

John Gilliam

John Gilliam only played three seasons with the Cardinals, but he made those years count. In 1969, he caught 52 passes for 997 yards and 9 touchdowns; in 1970, he hauled in 45 passes for 952 yards and 5 touchdowns; and in 1971, he pulled down 42 passes for 837 yards and 3 touchdowns. He averaged 20 yards per reception during his tenure.

Arizona Cardinals wide receiver, John Brown (12), is lifted by tight end Jermaine Gresham (84) as he celebrates a third quarter touchdown with Larry Fitzgerald (11) against the New York Giants.
Arizona Cardinals wide receiver, John Brown (12), is lifted by tight end Jermaine Gresham (84) as he celebrates a third quarter touchdown with Larry Fitzgerald (11) against the New York Giants. | Source

Arizona Cardinals Wide Receiver History

The following is a look at the individual statistics for every 1,000-yard receiving season in the history of the Chicago/St. Louis/Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals.

Player
Year
G
GS
Rec
Yds
TD
David Boston
2001
16
15
98
1598
8
Rob Moore
1997
16
16
97
1584
8
Roy Green
1984
16
16
78
1555
12
Larry Fitzgerald
2008
16
16
96
1431
12
Larry Fitzgerald
2011
16
16
80
1411
8
Larry Fitzgerald
2005
16
16
103
1409
10
Larry Fitzgerald
2007
15
15
100
1409
10
Anquan Boldin
2005
14
14
102
1402
7
Anquan Boldin
2003
16
16
101
1377
8
Roy Green
1983
16
15
78
1227
14
Larry Fitzgerald
2015
16
16
109
1215
9
Jackie Smith (TE)
1967
14
14
56
1205
9
Anquan Boldin
2006
16
16
83
1203
4
Sonny Randle
1962
14
14
63
1158
7
Larry Fitzgerald
2017
16
16
109
1156
6
David Boston
2000
16
16
71
1156
7
Frank Sanders
1998
16
16
89
1145
3
Larry Fitzgerald
2010
16
15
90
1137
6
J.T. Smith
1987
15
14
91
1117
8
Roy Green
1988
16
16
68
1097
7
Larry Fitzgerald
2009
16
16
97
1092
13
Michael Floyd
2013
16
16
65
1041
5
Pat Tilley
1981
16
16
66
1040
3
Anquan Boldin
2008
12
11
89
1038
11
Anquan Boldin
2009
15
15
84
1024
4
Larry Fitzgerald
2016
16
16
107
1023
6
Frank Sanders
1997
16
16
75
1017
4
Rob Moore
1996
16
16
58
1016
4
J.T. Smith
1986
16
16
80
1014
6
Sonny Randle
1963
14
13
51
1014
12
Steve Breaston
2008
16
9
77
1006
3
John Brown
2015
15
11
65
1003
7

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