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The Renaissance of Federer and Nadal

Updated on August 8, 2017
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I am a rising senior at Glastonbury High School in Connecticut that enjoys writing about tennis as well as other topics.

A Unique Time of Tennis

To many casual tennis fans, seeing that Roger and Rafa are now at the top is no surprise. But for much of the past six years, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have been the dominant forces of men's professional tennis, winning the majority of the ATP masters and major tournaments. However, ever since the end of the 2016 season, both of these players have experienced declines in their performances, which has allowed Federer and Nadal to climb the rankings once again. In fact, many tennis analysts believe that barring any unexpected ailments, the two could finish this year as numbers one and two in the world, just as they did in 2010. This type of resurgence is surprising for Rafa and Roger, whom although are extremely talented, are reaching the latter stages of their careers. Arguably what is even more unexpected, though, is the sudden recession of both Andy and Novak.

The Last Major of the Year: The US Open

Louis Armstrong Stadium
Louis Armstrong Stadium

Injuries of Novak and Andy: Physical and Mental

The reasons behind the struggles of Novak and Andy are somewhat unclear. At recent presses conferences, both of them have blamed these on injuries: Novak citing his elbow, and Murray mentioning his hip. However, while injuries may have played a large role in Murray's poor performance, it is hard to say the same about Novak's. His fall from the top began in the middle of 2016, following a loss to the big hitting American Sam Querrey at Wimbledon. If the issue has been his elbow the whole time, why has he been keeping it a secret until now? And why did he fire almost his entire coaching and training staff just a few months ago? It is not like a new staff will magically heal his injuries.

Evidence for this mass dismissal can be seen in the decreasing confidence of Djokovic in himself. During his matches over the last year, Djokovic has shown various signs of mental defeat: complaining to his coaches box, bobbing his head, moving lethargically around the court. This type of behavior was rarely seen in champion form Novak, who always appeared to possess more energy and desire than his opponents, never appearing disinterested. Once he began to lose belief in himself, every match since has been played with a seed of doubt in his mind. His opponents, who have become aware of this, have had more confidence playing against him. In result, they had more success and Novak has had less. Djoker felt that he needed to change the people around him in order to reach his peak performance once again, and ultimately win more matches. But knowing what kind of character he can be, how much of it is in his own head?

Murray in Action

Murray Striking a Backhand
Murray Striking a Backhand | Source

Success Depends Partly on One's Competition

Regardless, Federer and Nadal look to capitalize on Novak's retirement and Andy's shaky form. Without Andy and Novak in the draw, the greats will have a much easier time reaching tournament finals. Another potential obstacle, Stan Wawrinka, a man who is 3-1 against the big four in Grand Slam finals, has also decided to rest for the rest of the season due to injury.

Despite the lack of major threats that remain in Fed and Rafa's way, there are other formidable competitors that remain. Thiem, Raonic, and Zverev are just a few on that list. Cilic is somewhat of a dark horse, beating Federer in the 2014 semi's on the US Open, then going on to win the tournament against Nishikori. However, it can be argued that both Roger and Rafa are playing the best tennis of their careers right now, almost as if their talents allow them to ignore father time. All I can say is watch out ATP: a feasting session more grand than those at Hogwarts is about to begin.

What do you know about tennis?


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